What is Plagiarism?

 What is Plagiarism?

Plagiarism is the deliberate inclusion or reproduction in one’s own work of the thoughts, ideas, concepts, conclusions, evidence, inferences, musings, essays, words, projects, or data of another person without giving clear and ample evidence both in the text AND in a Works Cited list or bibliography.

The following ARE ALL EXAMPLES OF PLAGIARISM. There may be other forms of plagiarism that do not appear here.

Plagiarism includes the following:

1. copying what someone else wrote or thought, even if that person is just a friend and even if it’s just a little bit
2. using another person’s ideas or concepts but putting them into your own words
3. copying and pasting information, even a little bit, from a website or other electronic source or document and not giving clear and ample credit to the real author in your text AND in a works cited list
4. having someone else write the paper for you
5. having someone else write part of the paper, even a little bit, for you.
6. having someone else “edit” the paper substantially and/or rewrite it for you
7. having someone else compose or think of the paper’s ideas or organization for you
8. reading what people wrote about your text and putting all those ideas into your own words without giving clear and ample credit to the real authors in the text AND in a works cited list.
9. using the exact words someone else wrote, but without putting quotation marks around it to indicate that these are the other person’s exact words and not your paraphrase or summary.

If you commit plagiarism, even a little bit, you will receive a ZERO on the paper with NO MAKE-UP POSSIBLE.

I will be concerned about plagiarism for several of the following reasons. Concerned does not mean “I believe you plagiarized.” It means that I’m concerned. That’s it. I may be concerned about plagiarism for other reasons besides or in addition to these. NOTE: Just because I’m concerned doesn’t mean that I think you necessarily plagiarized. It also doesn’t mean I’m going to accuse you without reason.

I will be concerned for the following reasons:

1. if your writing style is substantially different from what I am used to reading from you
2. if your writing style, word choice, quote choice, analysis, and/or organizational pattern strongly resembles another student’s work
3. if a student loses a chart, outline, or draft following peer editing
4. if your writing style, word choice, quote choice, analysis, and/or organizational pattern strongly resembles any other source I can find, e.g., an Internet source or book, article, et cetera
5. if the writing style in general shows a level of sophistication far out of the norm for a person of your level and age AND (most importantly) out of your own personal norm as revealed in writing and in class discussion
6. if your final product does not strongly and visibly resemble your evidence chart and/or outline and/or draft(s).
BOTTOM LINE: Let your work be your own.

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